local_florist

Thoughts From Dianna

You can find our latest posts on this page. Click on the calendar to review postings from prior periods and remember to check back here often!

Hugs we've missed

Published: April 4, 2022 by Dianna Pandak

Hugs, Hugs, Hugs (not elbow bumps)

Respected family therapist, Virginia Satir, over many years of practice, said that “we need 4 hugs a day for survival, 8 a day for maintenance, and 12 a day for growth.” This got me thinking about all the hugs we've missed since “social distancing”. I'm a “hugger”. I love giving and getting hugs. So I knew I was missing my daily hug “fix” - as well as not seeing smiles behind the masks. So much humanness lost during this time. It was so keenly observed and felt here at the funeral home.

I dug into the reasons Ms. Satir might have considered hugs so vital. An article by Christine Comaford, shed the some light. She says that hugs strengthen our immune systems. Actual science: a hug puts pressure on our sternum which stimulates the thymus gland and that gland regulates our production of white blood cells. Remember 8th grade health class? those white cells keep us healthy! Hugs increase circulation and help balance our sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems.

Also science: hugs boost oxytocin levels – which heal feelings of loneliness. Isolation and anger. I looked up oxytocin and it's a hormone associated with empathy and trust. (other stuff too but you can dig into more study if you are so inclined...)

She continues that hugs lasting longer that 20 seconds boosts your serotonin levels. More science: serotonin is a neurotransmitter which modulated moods, cognition, learning and memory. It's like sunshine!

Finally, it's what all “huggers” know – hugs help us feel safe, connected, and even help us feel relaxed. Hugs are a shared experience, a way to share affection and caring.

We've missed so many hugs, it's time to start catching up!

For more info on hugs from Christine Comaford go to: smarttribesinstitute.com

Hugs, Hugs, Hugs (not elbow bumps)

Respected family therapist, Virginia Satir, over many years of practice, said that “we need 4 hugs a day for survival, 8 a day for maintenance, and 12 a day for growth.” This got me thinking about all the hugs we've missed since “social distancing”. I'm a “hugger”. I love giving and getting hugs. So I knew I was missing my daily hug “fix” - as well as not seeing smiles behind the masks. So much humanness lost during this time. It was so keenly observed and felt here at the funeral home.

I dug into the reasons Ms. Satir might have considered hugs so vital. An article by Christine Comaford, shed the some light. She says that hugs strengthen our immune systems. Actual science: a hug puts pressure on our sternum which stimulates the thymus gland and that gland regulates our production of white blood cells. Remember 8th grade health class? those white cells keep us healthy! Hugs increase circulation and help balance our sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems.

Also science: hugs boost oxytocin levels – which heal feelings of loneliness. Isolation and anger. I looked up oxytocin and it's a hormone associated with empathy and trust. (other stuff too but you can dig into more study if you are so inclined...)

She continues that hugs lasting longer that 20 seconds boosts your serotonin levels. More science: serotonin is a neurotransmitter which modulated moods, cognition, learning and memory. It's like sunshine!

Finally, it's what all “huggers” know – hugs help us feel safe, connected, and even help us feel relaxed. Hugs are a shared experience, a way to share affection and caring.

We've missed so many hugs, it's time to start catching up!

For more info on hugs from Christine Comaford go to: smarttribesinstitute.com

Hugs, Hugs, Hugs (not elbow bumps)

Respected family therapist, Virginia Satir, over many years of practice, said that “we need 4 hugs a day for survival, 8 a day for maintenance, and 12 a day for growth.” This got me thinking about all the hugs we've missed since “social distancing”. I'm a “hugger”. I love giving and getting hugs. So I knew I was missing my daily hug “fix” - as well as not seeing smiles behind the masks. So much humanness lost during this time. It was so keenly observed and felt here at the funeral home.

I dug into the reasons Ms. Satir might have considered hugs so vital. An article by Christine Comaford, shed the some light. She says that hugs strengthen our immune systems. Actual science: a hug puts pressure on our sternum which stimulates the thymus gland and that gland regulates our production of white blood cells. Remember 8th grade health class? those white cells keep us healthy! Hugs increase circulation and help balance our sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems.

Also science: hugs boost oxytocin levels – which heal feelings of loneliness. Isolation and anger. I looked up oxytocin and it's a hormone associated with empathy and trust. (other stuff too but you can dig into more study if you are so inclined...)

She continues that hugs lasting longer that 20 seconds boosts your serotonin levels. More science: serotonin is a neurotransmitter which modulated moods, cognition, learning and memory. It's like sunshine!

Finally, it's what all “huggers” know – hugs help us feel safe, connected, and even help us feel relaxed. Hugs are a shared experience, a way to share affection and caring.

We've missed so many hugs, it's time to start catching up!

For more info on hugs from Christine Comaford go to: smarttribesinstitute.com

Hugs, Hugs, Hugs (not elbow bumps)

Respected family therapist, Virginia Satir, over many years of practice, said that “we need 4 hugs a day for survival, 8 a day for maintenance, and 12 a day for growth.” This got me thinking about all the hugs we've missed since “social distancing”. I'm a “hugger”. I love giving and getting hugs. So I knew I was missing my daily hug “fix” - as well as not seeing smiles behind the masks. So much humanness lost during this time. It was so keenly observed and felt here at the funeral home.

I dug into the reasons Ms. Satir might have considered hugs so vital. An article by Christine Comaford, shed the some light. She says that hugs strengthen our immune systems. Actual science: a hug puts pressure on our sternum which stimulates the thymus gland and that gland regulates our production of white blood cells. Remember 8th grade health class? those white cells keep us healthy! Hugs increase circulation and help balance our sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems.

Also science: hugs boost oxytocin levels – which heal feelings of loneliness. Isolation and anger. I looked up oxytocin and it's a hormone associated with empathy and trust. (other stuff too but you can dig into more study if you are so inclined...)

She continues that hugs lasting longer that 20 seconds boosts your serotonin levels. More science: serotonin is a neurotransmitter which modulated moods, cognition, learning and memory. It's like sunshine!

Finally, it's what all “huggers” know – hugs help us feel safe, connected, and even help us feel relaxed. Hugs are a shared experience, a way to share affection and caring.

We've missed so many hugs, it's time to start catching up!

For more info on hugs from Christine Comaford go to: smarttribesinstitute.com

 

Hugs, Hugs, Hugs (not elbow bumps)

Respected family therapist, Virginia Satir, over many years of practice, said that “we need 4 hugs a day for survival, 8 a day for maintenance, and 12 a day for growth.” This got me thinking about all the hugs we've missed since “social distancing”. I'm a “hugger”. I love giving and getting hugs. So I knew I was missing my daily hug “fix” - as well as not seeing smiles behind the masks. So much humanness lost during this time. It was so keenly observed and felt here at the funeral home.

I dug into the reasons Ms. Satir might have considered hugs so vital. An article by Christine Comaford, shed the some light. She says that hugs strengthen our immune systems. Actual science: a hug puts pressure on our sternum which stimulates the thymus gland and that gland regulates our production of white blood cells. Remember 8th grade health class? those white cells keep us healthy! Hugs increase circulation and help balance our sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems.

Also science: hugs boost oxytocin levels – which heal feelings of loneliness. Isolation and anger. I looked up oxytocin and it's a hormone associated with empathy and trust. (other stuff too but you can dig into more study if you are so inclined...)

She continues that hugs lasting longer that 20 seconds boosts your serotonin levels. More science: serotonin is a neurotransmitter which modulated moods, cognition, learning and memory. It's like sunshine!

Finally, it's what all “huggers” know – hugs help us feel safe, connected, and even help us feel relaxed. Hugs are a shared experience, a way to share affection and caring.

We've missed so many hugs, it's time to start catching up!

For more info on hugs from Christine Comaford go to: smarttribesinstitute.com

 

Hugs we've missed

Published: April 4, 2022 by Dianna Pandak

Hugs, Hugs, Hugs (not elbow bumps)

Respected family therapist, Virginia Satir, over many years of practice, said that “we need 4 hugs a day for survival, 8 a day for maintenance, and 12 a day for growth.” This got me thinking about all the hugs we've missed since “social distancing”. I'm a “hugger”. I love giving and getting hugs. So I knew I was missing my daily hug “fix” - as well as not seeing smiles behind the masks. So much humanness lost during this time. It was so keenly observed and felt here at the funeral home.

I dug into the reasons Ms. Satir might have considered hugs so vital. An article by Christine Comaford, shed the some light. She says that hugs strengthen our immune systems. Actual science: a hug puts pressure on our sternum which stimulates the thymus gland and that gland regulates our production of white blood cells. Remember 8th grade health class? those white cells keep us healthy! Hugs increase circulation and help balance our sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems.

Also science: hugs boost oxytocin levels – which heal feelings of loneliness. Isolation and anger. I looked up oxytocin and it's a hormone associated with empathy and trust. (other stuff too but you can dig into more study if you are so inclined...)

She continues that hugs lasting longer that 20 seconds boosts your serotonin levels. More science: serotonin is a neurotransmitter which modulated moods, cognition, learning and memory. It's like sunshine!

Finally, it's what all “huggers” know – hugs help us feel safe, connected, and even help us feel relaxed. Hugs are a shared experience, a way to share affection and caring.

We've missed so many hugs, it's time to start catching up!

For more info on hugs from Christine Comaford go to: smarttribesinstitute.com

Hugs, Hugs, Hugs (not elbow bumps)

Respected family therapist, Virginia Satir, over many years of practice, said that “we need 4 hugs a day for survival, 8 a day for maintenance, and 12 a day for growth.” This got me thinking about all the hugs we've missed since “social distancing”. I'm a “hugger”. I love giving and getting hugs. So I knew I was missing my daily hug “fix” - as well as not seeing smiles behind the masks. So much humanness lost during this time. It was so keenly observed and felt here at the funeral home.

I dug into the reasons Ms. Satir might have considered hugs so vital. An article by Christine Comaford, shed the some light. She says that hugs strengthen our immune systems. Actual science: a hug puts pressure on our sternum which stimulates the thymus gland and that gland regulates our production of white blood cells. Remember 8th grade health class? those white cells keep us healthy! Hugs increase circulation and help balance our sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems.

Also science: hugs boost oxytocin levels – which heal feelings of loneliness. Isolation and anger. I looked up oxytocin and it's a hormone associated with empathy and trust. (other stuff too but you can dig into more study if you are so inclined...)

She continues that hugs lasting longer that 20 seconds boosts your serotonin levels. More science: serotonin is a neurotransmitter which modulated moods, cognition, learning and memory. It's like sunshine!

Finally, it's what all “huggers” know – hugs help us feel safe, connected, and even help us feel relaxed. Hugs are a shared experience, a way to share affection and caring.

We've missed so many hugs, it's time to start catching up!

For more info on hugs from Christine Comaford go to: smarttribesinstitute.com

Hugs, Hugs, Hugs (not elbow bumps)

Respected family therapist, Virginia Satir, over many years of practice, said that “we need 4 hugs a day for survival, 8 a day for maintenance, and 12 a day for growth.” This got me thinking about all the hugs we've missed since “social distancing”. I'm a “hugger”. I love giving and getting hugs. So I knew I was missing my daily hug “fix” - as well as not seeing smiles behind the masks. So much humanness lost during this time. It was so keenly observed and felt here at the funeral home.

I dug into the reasons Ms. Satir might have considered hugs so vital. An article by Christine Comaford, shed the some light. She says that hugs strengthen our immune systems. Actual science: a hug puts pressure on our sternum which stimulates the thymus gland and that gland regulates our production of white blood cells. Remember 8th grade health class? those white cells keep us healthy! Hugs increase circulation and help balance our sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems.

Also science: hugs boost oxytocin levels – which heal feelings of loneliness. Isolation and anger. I looked up oxytocin and it's a hormone associated with empathy and trust. (other stuff too but you can dig into more study if you are so inclined...)

She continues that hugs lasting longer that 20 seconds boosts your serotonin levels. More science: serotonin is a neurotransmitter which modulated moods, cognition, learning and memory. It's like sunshine!

Finally, it's what all “huggers” know – hugs help us feel safe, connected, and even help us feel relaxed. Hugs are a shared experience, a way to share affection and caring.

We've missed so many hugs, it's time to start catching up!

For more info on hugs from Christine Comaford go to: smarttribesinstitute.com

Hugs, Hugs, Hugs (not elbow bumps)

Respected family therapist, Virginia Satir, over many years of practice, said that “we need 4 hugs a day for survival, 8 a day for maintenance, and 12 a day for growth.” This got me thinking about all the hugs we've missed since “social distancing”. I'm a “hugger”. I love giving and getting hugs. So I knew I was missing my daily hug “fix” - as well as not seeing smiles behind the masks. So much humanness lost during this time. It was so keenly observed and felt here at the funeral home.

I dug into the reasons Ms. Satir might have considered hugs so vital. An article by Christine Comaford, shed the some light. She says that hugs strengthen our immune systems. Actual science: a hug puts pressure on our sternum which stimulates the thymus gland and that gland regulates our production of white blood cells. Remember 8th grade health class? those white cells keep us healthy! Hugs increase circulation and help balance our sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems.

Also science: hugs boost oxytocin levels – which heal feelings of loneliness. Isolation and anger. I looked up oxytocin and it's a hormone associated with empathy and trust. (other stuff too but you can dig into more study if you are so inclined...)

She continues that hugs lasting longer that 20 seconds boosts your serotonin levels. More science: serotonin is a neurotransmitter which modulated moods, cognition, learning and memory. It's like sunshine!

Finally, it's what all “huggers” know – hugs help us feel safe, connected, and even help us feel relaxed. Hugs are a shared experience, a way to share affection and caring.

We've missed so many hugs, it's time to start catching up!

For more info on hugs from Christine Comaford go to: smarttribesinstitute.com

 

Hugs, Hugs, Hugs (not elbow bumps)

Respected family therapist, Virginia Satir, over many years of practice, said that “we need 4 hugs a day for survival, 8 a day for maintenance, and 12 a day for growth.” This got me thinking about all the hugs we've missed since “social distancing”. I'm a “hugger”. I love giving and getting hugs. So I knew I was missing my daily hug “fix” - as well as not seeing smiles behind the masks. So much humanness lost during this time. It was so keenly observed and felt here at the funeral home.

I dug into the reasons Ms. Satir might have considered hugs so vital. An article by Christine Comaford, shed the some light. She says that hugs strengthen our immune systems. Actual science: a hug puts pressure on our sternum which stimulates the thymus gland and that gland regulates our production of white blood cells. Remember 8th grade health class? those white cells keep us healthy! Hugs increase circulation and help balance our sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems.

Also science: hugs boost oxytocin levels – which heal feelings of loneliness. Isolation and anger. I looked up oxytocin and it's a hormone associated with empathy and trust. (other stuff too but you can dig into more study if you are so inclined...)

She continues that hugs lasting longer that 20 seconds boosts your serotonin levels. More science: serotonin is a neurotransmitter which modulated moods, cognition, learning and memory. It's like sunshine!

Finally, it's what all “huggers” know – hugs help us feel safe, connected, and even help us feel relaxed. Hugs are a shared experience, a way to share affection and caring.

We've missed so many hugs, it's time to start catching up!

For more info on hugs from Christine Comaford go to: smarttribesinstitute.com

 

© 2022 Glenn E. George and Son Funeral Home. All Rights Reserved. Funeral Home website by CFS & TA | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Accessibility